Beginner
10 min

Experience the next level of accuracy and synchronization in your projects with DS2417 and PIC32MZ2048EFM100

Let's make every millisecond count!

RTC 4 Click with Curiosity PIC32 MZ EF

Published Nov 02, 2023

Click board™

RTC 4 Click

Dev.Board

Curiosity PIC32 MZ EF

Compiler

NECTO Studio

MCU

PIC32MZ2048EFM100

Enhance your profitability and efficiency with our real-time clock solution, delivering reliable timekeeping for your critical applications

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Hardware Overview

How does it work?

RTC 4 Click is based on the DS2417, a real-time clock from Analog Devices, offering a simple solution for storing and retrieving vital time information with minimal hardware. The DS2417 contains a real-time clock/calendar implemented as a 32-bit binary counter and a unique factory-lasered 64-bit registration number, allowing multiple Click boards™ to be connected on the same data line. It communicates with the host MCU through a standard Dallas Semiconductor 1-Wire interface (16.3kbps). It has a clock accuracy of ±2 minutes per month at a 25 degrees Celsius temperature and a clock frequency derived from an onboard 32.768kHz oscillator. The DS2417's data is nonvolatile and can be used for stand-alone operation thanks to a backup energy source

(an onboard coin cell supercapacitor). The DS2417 adds functions such as a calendar, time and date stamp, and logbook to any electronic device or embedded microcontroller application. It can accumulate 136 years of seconds before rolling over, where time/date is represented by the number of seconds since a reference point, which the user determines. This Click board™ communicates with MCU using the 1-Wire interface that, by definition, requires only one data line (and ground) for communication with MCU. Without the main power supply, the data line can also power the sensor parasitically. The 1-Wire communication line is routed to the GP SEL jumper, allowing the 1-Wire communication signal to the PWM pin or the AN pin of the mikroBUS™

socket. These pins are labeled GP0 and GP1, respectively, the same as the SMD jumper positions, making selecting the desired pin straightforward. Besides, the DS2417 also includes an interrupt feature routed to the INT pin of the mikroBUS™ socket for system output. This Click board™ can operate with either 3.3V or 5V logic voltage levels selected via the VCC SEL jumper. This way, both 3.3V and 5V capable MCUs can use the communication lines properly. Also, this Click board™ comes equipped with a library containing easy-to-use functions and an example code that can be used as a reference for further development.

RTC 4 Click hardware overview image

Features overview

Development board

Curiosity PIC32 MZ EF development board is a fully integrated 32-bit development platform featuring the high-performance PIC32MZ EF Series (PIC32MZ2048EFM) that has a 2MB Flash, 512KB RAM, integrated FPU, Crypto accelerator, and excellent connectivity options. It includes an integrated programmer and debugger, requiring no additional hardware. Users can expand

functionality through MIKROE mikroBUS™ Click™ adapter boards, add Ethernet connectivity with the Microchip PHY daughter board, add WiFi connectivity capability using the Microchip expansions boards, and add audio input and output capability with Microchip audio daughter boards. These boards are fully integrated into PIC32’s powerful software framework, MPLAB Harmony,

which provides a flexible and modular interface to application development a rich set of inter-operable software stacks (TCP-IP, USB), and easy-to-use features. The Curiosity PIC32 MZ EF development board offers expansion capabilities making it an excellent choice for a rapid prototyping board in Connectivity, IOT, and general-purpose applications.

Curiosity PIC32MZ EF double side image

Microcontroller Overview

MCU Card / MCU

default

Architecture

PIC32

MCU Memory (KB)

2048

Silicon Vendor

Microchip

Pin count

100

RAM (Bytes)

524288

Used MCU Pins

mikroBUS™ mapper

1-Wire Data IN/OUT
RPB4
AN
NC
NC
RST
NC
NC
CS
NC
NC
SCK
NC
NC
MISO
NC
NC
MOSI
Power Supply
3.3V
3.3V
Ground
GND
GND
1-Wire Data IN/OUT
RPE8
PWM
Interrupt
RF13
INT
NC
NC
TX
NC
NC
RX
NC
NC
SCL
NC
NC
SDA
Power Supply
5V
5V
Ground
GND
GND
1

Take a closer look

Schematic

RTC 4 Click Schematic schematic

Step by step

Project assembly

Curiosity PIC32MZ EF front image hardware assembly

Start by selecting your development board and Click board™. Begin with the Curiosity PIC32 MZ EF as your development board.

Curiosity PIC32MZ EF front image hardware assembly
Thermo 28 Click front image hardware assembly
Prog-cut hardware assembly
Curiosity PIC32 MZ EF MB 1 - upright/background hardware assembly
Necto image step 2 hardware assembly
Necto image step 3 hardware assembly
Necto image step 4 hardware assembly
Necto image step 5 hardware assembly
Necto image step 6 hardware assembly
Curiosity PIC32 MZ EF MCU Step hardware assembly
Necto No Display image step 8 hardware assembly
Necto image step 9 hardware assembly
Necto image step 10 hardware assembly
Debug Image Necto Step hardware assembly

Track your results in real time

Application Output

After loading the code example, pressing the "DEBUG" button builds and programs it on the selected setup.

Application Output Step 1

After programming is completed, a header with buttons for various actions available in the IDE appears. By clicking the green "PLAY "button, we start reading the results achieved with Click board™.

Application Output Step 3

Upon completion of programming, the Application Output tab is automatically opened, where the achieved result can be read. In case of an inability to perform the Debug function, check if a proper connection between the MCU used by the setup and the CODEGRIP programmer has been established. A detailed explanation of the CODEGRIP-board connection can be found in the CODEGRIP User Manual. Please find it in the RESOURCES section.

Application Output Step 4

Software Support

Library Description

This library contains API for RTC 4 Click driver.

Key functions:

  • rtc4_get_interrupt - This function checks the interrupt state of the DS2417 Real time clock/calendar.

  • rtc4_set_date_time - This function sets date and time structure along with interrupt interval.

  • rtc4_get_date_time - This function gets RTC4 time and date structure.

Open Source

Code example

This example can be found in NECTO Studio. Feel free to download the code, or you can copy the code below.

/*!
 * @file main.c
 * @brief RTC 4 Click Example.
 *
 * # Description
 * This example demonstrates the use of the RTC 4 click board.
 *
 * The demo application is composed of two sections :
 *
 * ## Application Init
 * Initializes the driver and logger and then sets the starting time 
 * to 23:59:50 and date to 31.12.2022.
 *
 * ## Application Task
 * With the usage of rtc4_get_date_time we get the time and 
 * date from the register and display them on the UART Terminal. 
 * The counter increments once per second. 
 *
 * @author Aleksandra Cvjetićanin
 *
 */

#include "board.h"
#include "log.h"
#include "rtc4.h"

static rtc4_t rtc4;
static log_t logger;

rtc4_time_t time; 
rtc4_date_t date; 

void application_init ( void ) 
{
    log_cfg_t log_cfg;  /**< Logger config object. */
    rtc4_cfg_t rtc4_cfg;  /**< Click config object. */

    /** 
     * Logger initialization.
     * Default baud rate: 115200
     * Default log level: LOG_LEVEL_DEBUG
     * @note If USB_UART_RX and USB_UART_TX 
     * are defined as HAL_PIN_NC, you will 
     * need to define them manually for log to work. 
     * See @b LOG_MAP_USB_UART macro definition for detailed explanation.
     */
    LOG_MAP_USB_UART( log_cfg );
    log_init( &logger, &log_cfg );
    log_info( &logger, " Application Init " );

    // Click initialization.
    rtc4_cfg_setup( &rtc4_cfg );
    RTC4_MAP_MIKROBUS( rtc4_cfg, MIKROBUS_1 );
    if ( ONE_WIRE_ERROR == rtc4_init( &rtc4, &rtc4_cfg ) ) 
    {
        log_error( &logger, " Communication init." );
        for ( ; ; );
    }
    
    if ( RTC4_ERROR == rtc4_check_communication ( &rtc4 ) )
    {
        log_error( &logger, " Check communication." );
        for ( ; ; );
    }
    
    time.hours = 23;
    time.min = 59; 
    time.sec = 50; 
    
    date.day = 31;
    date.month = 12; 
    date.year = 2022; 
    
    rtc4_set_date_time ( &rtc4, &date, &time, RTC4_DCB_INTERVAL_1S ); 
    
    log_info( &logger, " Application Task " );
}    

void application_task ( void ) 
{
    while ( rtc4_get_interrupt ( &rtc4 ) ); 
    
    if ( RTC4_OK == rtc4_get_date_time ( &rtc4, &date, &time ) ) 
    {
        log_printf( &logger, "Time: %.2u:%.2u:%.2u\r\n", 
                    ( uint16_t ) time.hours, ( uint16_t ) time.min, ( uint16_t ) time.sec ); 
        log_printf( &logger, "Date: %.2u/%.2u/%u\r\n", 
                    ( uint16_t ) date.day, ( uint16_t ) date.month, ( uint16_t ) date.year ); 
        log_printf( &logger, "------------------------\r\n\n"); 
    }
}

void main ( void ) 
{
    application_init( );

    for ( ; ; ) 
    {
        application_task( );
    }
}

// ------------------------------------------------------------------------ END

Additional Support

Resources